All the gifts are unwrapped and open. Boxes, bows and wrapping paper are everywhere around the room. The kids are happy and enjoying all their Christmas gifts. Or maybe not…

Maybe your teenage son is upset because he didn’t get the “Yeezy” shoes he wanted. Maybe 15 minutes later, your daughter is complaining that she has nothing to do. Or maybe your kids fighting already because someone else got some better and it’s just “not fair”?

And no one even said, “thank you.”

All of holiday cheer is over and the post-Christmas gift letdown is in full swing!  Pull up the “letdown” and make a plan to survive post-Christmas gifts! There is still time to prepare your kids for what happens after your children open their gifts!

Tips to survive post-Christmas gifts! 

  1. Thank You Cards: Bring out the crayons, markers and paper! Help your children appreciate the gifts they received by encouraging them to write thank-you cards.  If your children are resistant to handwriting a note, encourage them to post on their Tik Tok, Instagram or Snapchat a thankful video.
  2. One-In/ One-Out Rule: Too many toys have you feeling overwhelmed? Start the one-in/one-out rule.   Encourage your children to give away one toy, book, video game or clothing item for each gift they receive. This can be done prior to Christmas.
  3. Media Contracts: Are you giving your kids a video game, iPod, cell phone or computer?  Decide on a media contract with your child. If you cannot do it before Christmas, get it together and do it as soon as possible. Also, check out our “Take Control of Screen Time” blog.

Things to consider:

    • How much time/access will your child have on a daily basis?
    • Where will it be stored? Will you need a charging station in your home?
    • What is the password? Clarify that parents will have access to passwords and will periodically monitor use.
    • Have instructions on how to set up the parental controls. 
  1. Cash for Gift Cards: Do your children impulse buy? If you are concerned about your child’s spending habits, giving them cash for gift cards will help them visualize how much money they have to spend. Create a budget with them and how they can wisely spend their Christmas money.
  2. Happiness does not Equal Gifts: Gifts tend to take center stage on Christmas. Be intentional with creating high spirits by putting on some upbeat Christmas music, singing a silly song, making hot cocoa, going sledding, watching a movie or playing a board game together. Gifts can give you a temporary feeling of happiness, but it doesn’t last.  Focus on building and maintaining the relationships in your family.

 

Jessica R. is a mom of 3 girls and the Operations Director of Finding Me Now